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Posts tagged ‘20s’

a la modest kosher casual rachel dahl winter fur russian shell bodycon dress a la modest kosher casual rachel dahl winter fur russian a la modest kosher casual rachel dahl winter fur russian shell bodycon dress a la modest kosher casual rachel dahl winter fur russian

Happy 2014! How have your style and personality changed in the past year? Often times the two go hand in hand. What personally attracts you to Audrey Hepburn vs Marilyn Monroe can tell a whole lot about yourself. I personally take some characteristics from each Hollywood diva. Audrey for general feminine and conservative style and brunette features and Marilyn for her womanly curves!

Although my general style hasn’t changed much (still somewhat modest and into textures), I feel like I’ve matured in my clothing in some ways. I don’t necessarily think that’s a good thing. It’s just different. Less bright colors and A-line skirts and more earth tones, pencil skirts, and fur.

I’ve been really into accentuating with faux fur, especially ever since my obsession with Russian winter styles and Art Deco period pieces (have a look at my previous Art Deco fashion post). I can’t get myself to keep full fur vintage coats though, because it’s a pain to have to take it to the cleaners. I don’t go to dry cleaners ever. I’m actually very practical (or lazy) with the upkeep of my clothes. I try to find clothes that don’t need to be ironed and can withstand a good amount of washing. I will however not pass up buying a good looking vintage fur coat just to put it up on Etsy and maybe use it once!

Although I generally believe in dressing appropriately (e.g. occasions, environment, and modesty beliefs), I don’t really think there’s an “appropriate” color, texture, or even style for a certain age. There may be an association to age, but I really don’t mind seeing 50 year olds with pink hair. In fact, I like it! I wish I could keep up with style as I age, but as some of us know the transition from childhood to adulthood styles often times come naturally. Teens and young adults everywhere wanting to prove their adulthood to the public dress sexier, and we see that in celebrities such as Miley Cyrus. Often times, the transition can get forced or driven by desperation and cry for attention. There is no peace within with such motivation and others will see it through you. If we were all honest with ourselves, we’d know that we all have that darkness in us. We need to expose it by bringing our motivation to light at least to ourselves and perhaps reevaluate why we choose what we wear.

Let’s get faux real. What do you find yourself wearing different since the last year or in the past? What may be the reason(s) behind that change?

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I’m wearing a shell layering dress from Kosher Casual that is advertised to be good for not only layering underneath but also to be worn alone. I paired it with monochrome thrifted vintage faux fur hat and collar with a hint of gold from vintage accessories. The dress isn’t really that tight as pictured honestly. It’s supposed to look more pencil than bodycon. The under bust corset I was wearing underneath clung to the material, especially since it was cold and windy out!

If you haven’t read my previous post on Erté, a famous Art Deco artist and fashion designer, feel free to poke around! Art Deco is a style of art originally from France from after World War I in the 1920s up until before the outbreak of the second World War in the 1940s. If you only think of flapper dresses when thinking about the 20s, think again!  Art Deco is characterized by lots of ornamentation, vivid colors, and machine inspired geometric patterns. People at the time took great pride and faith in their technological progress.

Below, you’ll find fashion illustrations from the time period in that style drawn by other notable artists.

Art Deco Fashion Design,fashion illustration,French fashion magazine La Vie Parisienne (5)
Source: Art Deco Design Times

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Source: CTG Publishing

artdecowinter fashion

Source: The Dandelion Chronicles

Some modern fashion renditions of Art Deco are below. I love these all, don’t you? Now all you need for these dresses from Holly Hunton below to make them wearable winter art deco is some faux fur or mink coat, shawl, hat, gloves, or collar—put them all on or just a few! Pick patterns and jewelry that are bold, with gold, and geometrical.

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 Source: Holly Fulton Spring 2011

If you’re not into wearing fur at all, you may opt to complete your Art Deco look by wearing outerwear with bat wing sleeves like below from Battise Fashions‘  winter collection:

battissefashionartdecobatwing

Source: Battise Fashions – Black Ragan Sleeve Knit Jacket | Black Knit & Leather Cocoon Jacket

battissefashionartdecobatwing2

Source: Batisse Fashions- Long Cocoon Animal Jacket | Short Cocoon Animal Jacket

Here are just a few vintage items from various decades on my Etsy that could work in that style:

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Top (L-R): Diane Freis top | Naeem Khan Riazee Nights beaded dress | Alex Ku Indian tribal top
Bottom (L-R): Andrew Geller pumps | Gwen Pennington faux fur / velvet/ suede hat

divider What is your favorite thing about Art Deco?
P.S. A GIVEAWAY for something with FUR from Battise Fashions is coming shortly!

flapperempower copy In 1922, a magazine called Flapper published the “Flapper Dictionary” and included Cosmo Hamilton’s definition of a flapper as having “a jitney body and a limousine mind.” A jitney was a cheap five cent ride, and limousines, we all know what those represent! Flapper magazine would at least be the most outspoken supporter for the flapper lifestyle at the time, but even they were aware of the reality—that flappers sold their bodies. It could be argued that the ability to sell your own body is part of a woman’s power, but at the same time it cheapens sex and your body as something you can put a number on.

orphansofthestorm
Orphans of the Storm (1921)

I’ve heard the argument that killing oneself should be every individual’s right. It’s a statement I fall prey to during my darkest of days. It is true, albeit somewhat, that your body is in fact your own. It’s not so easy to defend that when you’re under a marital covenant like me, having taken an oath in front of witnesses, swearing that you are one with your spouse and that your body is not just your own. When you’re single however, most people believe that you can do whatever you want with your body in the name of liberty. The legal system, working together to protect your civil liberties, also prohibits you to enjoy certain freedoms if they have somehow proven that what you do is harmful to yourself and others. Examples of such are the usage of marijuana and steroids, drinking while driving, and prostitution.

How does selling your body for sex harm yourself and others? Unlike marijuana, prostitution is frowned upon by the majority of people, mostly because of its relation to slave trade and sex trafficking. A lot of feminists I know frown upon the act as well and for basically the same reasons why I don’t espouse to it—being harmful to your own body and demeaning to the worth of women. It is a mystery to me why it is legal to be a sex worker via pornography but not in the streets (another topic for another time). So, why did the flapper sell herself? Perhaps because it was frowned upon, and it was her goal to do what was unconventional. Mind you, not all of them involved themselves in this business, but it was the general idea that came with the culture. It could’ve been a stereotype, but all stereotypes are derived from having something happen enough.

Everything else about flapperdom it seems is a delight to feminists. It is ironic however that the corset (which I am much a fan of) was representation of structure and was abandoned by forward-thinking women including the flappers; but now, corsets are attributed to promiscuity. All I know is that it makes me feel better with my posture, my shape, and my back!

I put the below outfit together for my idealized modern day flapper, with the elements of gold, feathers, tiered skirts, layered necklaces, and a fascinator—all of which a flapper in the 1920s would’ve incorporated in her dressing. The difference with my ideal flapper is that this woman would have had a limousine body and a limousine mind. She would, as I do now, enjoy her voting rights and her position as a boss of a business, without having to resort to using her own body as sign of power.

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Bag: Minsstyle | Dress: Belonda | Locket/Pendant: Fashion Junkie 4 Life | Shoes: Pamplemousse Vintage | Fascinator: These Woods | Pearls: Chanel

Bag’s name is Coco by designer Lily Vasaelini and can be purchased through Minsstyle. I’m very much into black and white contrasts, striped or not, and this purse looks very pleasing. It’s also a good size and made from quality Italian leather. The dress is from Belonda who makes silk printed dresses, and this somehow made me a think of a tamer flapper Bjork with its resemblance to a dress I’ve seen her wear!

The heart locket you see up there is actually a replica of a rare Victorian vinaigrette necklace. Back in the Victorian time, women didn’t have the luxury of bathing daily, so to cover up the evidence of that fact, they would dip the pad that you see up there in scented oil and place it in the locket. They’d wear it around their necks and replace the pad as needed!

 What do you like or dislike about the flapper culture?

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Great Gatsby (2013)

 

Romain de Tirtoff, commonly known as Erté (from his initials, R.T.) was well known in the modern world of the 1920s for his art deco designs applied to jewelry, film sets, and fashion. Art deco is characterized by lots of geometric shapes and bold patterns. which is what I was really into when I had an 80s outfit kick about a year ago! The modern era, largely in contrast with the punk and grunge years, was mostly about depicting wealth and affluence through artistic works. As you will see below, these women look like they are superstars (some of them below are named after mythical gods even). Here are a few of my favorites from this Russian-French artist’s costume portfolio:

tuxedo-erte vtagearterte1 asian-princess-erte athena-erte black costume-design-13 ertecostume on-the-avenue-erte the-end-of-romance-erte

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