À LA MODEST :: Conservative Indie Fashion Style Blogger - a la modest - a la mode st. - conservative indie style blog blogger

Archive for the ‘Film’ category

audreyhepburn

“I believe in manicures. I believe in overdressing. I believe in primping at leisure and wearing lipstick. I believe in pink. I believe happy girls are the prettiest girls.”

audreyhepburn5

“The beauty of a woman is not in a facial mode but the true beauty in a woman is reflected in her soul. It is the caring that she lovingly gives the passion that she shows. The beauty of a woman grows with the passing years.”

audreyhepburn8

“There’s more to sex appeal than just measurements. I don’t need a bedroom to prove my womanliness. I can convey just as much sex appeal, picking apples off a tree or standing in the rain.”
Such as Audrey Hepburn’s beautiful personality and talent, for instance. The quote above kind of reminds me of Ashton Kutcher’s “sexy” speech at the teen choice awards, where he says the the sexiest thing is a person’s brain. audreyhepburn3

“The beauty of a woman is not in the clothes she wears, the figure that she carries or the way she combs her hair.”

audreyhepburn9

Make no mistake about it: Audrey Hepburn was a remarkable woman. Not only was she one of the best actresses ever to have graced the silver screen, but she was also a good hearted humanitarian and – according to those who knew her – a lady who lived life to the full. What’s more, she always looked really good while doing it all!

Very few have managed to live up to Audrey Hepburn’s status as the ultimate style icon, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t some great lessons we can all learn and easily put into practice.

THE RIGHT FIT
(and length for your body type)

While Audrey Hepburn wasn’t especially tall, it often surprises people to learn that – at 5’7” – she was a good two or three inches above national average. The perception of her being a dainty girl was, in part, enforced by her being repeatedly cast alongside male leads with domineering statures. Obviously, we can’t all enhance our feminine physiques by appearing alongside, but thankfully there is another principle at play here.

Roman-Holiday-audrey-hepburn-824735_640_480

It all comes down to the FIT of the outfit. No matter whether it was a cocktail dress or a simple blouse, you’d be hard-pressed to find an image of Hepburn wearing an outfit that hung off her like a sack… not to say that you can’t look good in an oversized modest top like in a previous outfit post where I wore a large sweater. Of course you can! ;-)

audreyhepburn3

Audrey wore a lot of solid colored high neck tops (not necessarily turtle necks) and below the knee skirts and crop pants. Below, you’ll find modern day pieces tailored especially for taller women like her. There are tons of specialty stores for plus sizes and petites but not so much for tall figures. This store I found called Long Elengant Legs is specialty store for women with exactly that!

longelegantlegs longelegantlegs2

NOT A WAIST OF TIME

Audrey also had an incredibly small waist size of 20 inches, which you can achieve through a corset over time. However, if you’re not the type who will put comfort aside for style, you can cheat with high waist bottoms with waist cinchers!

audreyhepburn6

LIKE DIAMONDS IN THE SKY

Audrey wore large chunky diamond earrings as seen above and also from her classic look from Breakfast at Tiffany’s. The chunky diamond cluster looked kind of like these modern but classic looking diamond earrings. To add class to a regular gingham outfit from the above left photo, she wore diamond hoop earrings. Not everyone can afford or want to spend money on real diamonds, regardless of being them conflict free. This is where cubic zirconia, a fine and cheap alternative to diamonds, comes in.

audrey-hepburn-breakfast-at-tiffanys

Audrey Hepburn’s face was most characterized by her strikingly thick and shapely eyebrows, which can be achieved with a good pair of tweezers and a bit of eyebrow makeup magic. Her hair was usually in a neat updo with some baby “Bettie bangs,” which not everybody can pull off. Audrey’s best beauty advice however is…

 “For beautiful eyes, look for the good in others; for beautiful lips, speak only words of kindness; and for poise, walk with the knowledge that you are never alone.”

audreyhepburn7

 


black mold exposure karen

Karen Noseff is the Texan founder and designer of Fortune Denim. Even without any background in fashion, her jeans have been worn by celebrities like Fergie, Jessica Alba, Drew Barrymore, Mischa Barton… and the list goes on. She is also a contemporary dancer who later pursued singing for a career. Despite being the daughter of a Caucasian father and a first generation Asian mother who threatened to disown her if she didn’t become either a lawyer or a doctor (how typical!), Karen is now pursuing the American dream of doing what she has always loved to do for a living and being really successful at it. What a lucky girl!

Fortune Denim sailor jeans worn by Pin Up Girl Clothing:

fortune-denim-nanjing-navy

She wasn’t always this lucky, however. Not too long ago, Karen was struck with a rare and understudied illness that was caused or aggregated by toxic black mold. This hapa wasn’t a happy camper when her pretty face frequently transformed into what looked “like a monster,” as she’d say.

Her story is featured in length in a documentary called Black Mold Exposure. The movie is available both on their website and on Amazon and not really found anywhere else. It’s a film worth watching and buying for a friend, and I highly recommend it. It’s also in a way quite entertaining to watch, because it’s real but so bizarre. Below is the trailer:

Ad

As Bruce Banner (Hulk) is to anger, Karen Noseff is to mold.

The worst part about her situation is that not many believed that her sickness was real. You’d think, all she needed to do was to show up to a disbelieving friend or family member’s house in the middle of the night, or whenever she experienced the mold symptom, and show them her deformed face. Yet, she stayed strong. It was difficult enough to go through a sickness like this without a clue about the cause or cure. To be treated like you were crazy by those you trust and love was way too much to bear.

Watch Fortune Denim founder Karen’s interviews about her appearance in the movie below:

My Mold Story

I personally have been a victim of black mold. My mold symptom was developing a bad gluten sensitivity after moving into my husband’s house that had a problem with mold. I nor my family have ever had any allergies to speak of, so this was a real shocker. Something in our house caused it, and it wasn’t very obvious to me at first. The gluten allergy in itself was treated like it was non-existent years ago. Thankfully now, it is widely recognized, studied, provided for with options, and profited from. However as for mold symptoms or mold illness, it is not. My husband is in far worse shape than I am. I can just stay away from food containing gluten, and I am fine. He however is still recovering and figuring out how to heal himself, even after moving to a new residence.

How It Affects You

Just like gluten allergy symptoms, black mold symptoms are not the same from person to person. Once you are hit by a catalyst that lowers your immune system (in this case, black mold), the sky’s the limit on illnesses your body becomes prone to—from allergies to cancer. That is why someone with Lyme’s disease (ticks as catalyst) can have very similar symptoms or remedy for relief as someone with a gluten allergy, a mold allergy, acid reflux, etc. What doctors sell are drugs. What you probably need to do is to get rid of the catalyst first if you can and then strengthen your immune system with naturally available low mold, low toxin food from God’s green earth for starters.

If you have some spare time, please do watch Black Mold Exposure! Let me know what you think of it, and help spread the word about mold illness and what we can do to help others recognize it. What happened to Karen, me, and so many others can happen to you too.

 

suzannelloyd-lawoftheplainsman

Law of the Plainsman (1962)

suzannelloyd

Twilight Zone as Maya the Cat Girl (1959)

suzannelloyd-twilightzone

Twilight Zone – Ms. Thomas (1959)

suzannelloydthreebulletsforbat2

Bat Masterson –  Season 2 Ep 24 “Three Bullets for Bat” as Linda (1960)

suzannelloydthreebulletsforbat

Bat Masterson –  Season 2 Ep 24 “Three Bullets for Bat” as Linda (1960)

suzannelloyd2

suzannelloydgun

suzannelloydthesaint

The Saint (1962-1969)

suzannelloyd-thesaint

The Saint (1962-1969)

I first fell in love with Suzanne Lloyd’s face (particularly, her cheekbones) on season 1 episode 9 of the Twilight Zone called “Perchance to Dream.” Although her outfit was rather skimpy in that episode (she was playing the antagonist afterall), her face and acting were enough to capture hearts.

You won’t see too much of Suzanne on the Web though sadly, but you should be able to retrace her movie and TV appearances (mostly TV) from her full filmography on trusty IMDB. She played SEVERAL characters on The Saint, a TV show that ran from ’64 to ’69. She appeared in TV shows like The Avengers in ’65, Zorro from ’58-’61, and Bonanza in ’61.

I seriously think that women in the 40s/50s generally looked better than Hollywood actresses today because the food was better then. It was more organic and less commercialized. The women appeared to be healthier too, but of course a lot of it has to do with the changing perception of beauty as well.

Although I have high cheekbones myself, mine aren’t close to the likes of Suzanne Lloyd’s. However I’m sure with the right contour makeup and technique, you can achieve something like this! I’m a newbie with contouring, but I am having a lot of fun experimenting with highlights and shadows to achieve a chiseled feminine face like this lady!

Alas, Wes Anderson has done it again. Moonrise Kingdom looks like ’60s French Pop with its soft pastels and costumes. I don’t know—I think that style has been a bit overdone the past couple of years. I still like it, but it doesn’t toot my horn as much as it used to anymore. It’s too indie-girl cute, but then again—seeing Moonrise Kingdom has somehow made me like it again. It’s  beautifully chaotic, and the kids have attitude.

Is it devious of me to get amused seeing kids on screen causing/being a riot? That particular “art form” has gotten tamer throughout the years, though. Think Bad News Bears or The Goonies. Maybe I’ll change my mind when I actually have kids of my own. Right now, it’s just downright entertaining.

Check out Bill Murray and Kara Hayward (Suzy) wearing high fashion “space suits” from Harper’s Bazaar’s photoshoots.



Besides the obvious reusing of actors, here are just some of the style theme repeats from some of Wes Anderson’s other movies that I saw in Moonrise Kingdom:

The female lead, Mrs. Fox, from Fantastic Mr. Fox wore a bright yellow dress (which I also loved):

Bill Murray’s character, Steve Zissou, from The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou, wore a floppy red sock-like beanie. This was also worn by one of the other characters in Moonrise Kingdom, but it was green (scroll a few photos up).

One other repeated motif was a shared problem-child personality between young Margot Tenenbaum, played by Irene Gorovaia, from The Royal Tenenbaums, and Suzy from Moonrise Kingdom. I vaguely remember Margot wearing knee highs, but I guess it was just the fact that both characters had on high-neck and short-length dresses that made me think their outfits were very similar. Besides that, they were both well groomed and were big book worms.

 

Okay, so this post was actually completed literally minutes before my Web host wiped out my blog’s database about two months ago. Since I didn’t have a backup of that post, I’ll have to write this from scratch. I don’t think I can do as well as that post (it would have been legendary), but I’ll try.

Here lies another Fashion Inflicts Flicks (or vice versa) post, but this time, I am featuring just one glorious movie. I decided I was going to pick one movie every so often for my film series. The very first featured film will be none other than Jacques Demy’s gem from 1964, Les parapluies de Cherbourg (The Umbrellas of Cherbourg).

This is Geneviève Emery, played by the beautiful Catherine Deneuve. The first time I think I actually saw her in a movie was in Dancer in the Dark, where she plays the friend of Selma, who was in turn played by my doppelganger (I still don’t see it) Björk. The Umbrellas of Cherbourg was the film that brought Deneuve and director Demy to the forefront of  international attention. Deneuve’s character, Geneviève, and her mother, Madame Emery, run a petite and fashionable umbrella shop in the streets of Cherbourg, France. Before you think I’m going to give away any of the plot (not even the spoilers), I will not and would never do such a thing—that’s a complete nuisance and deserves some sort of theatrical noose of death. Why not just go see the movie if a post is just going to talk about the plot?

The Umbrellas of Cherbourg is an excellent example of operatic cinema, but unlike musicals, characters don’t break out into songs and dances—the whole movie is a musical dialogue between characters. As the characters sing, they manage to keep conversational in manner and facial expressions (they don’t even dance accidentally, though I can tell some of them are tempted to at times). It’s sheer genius. Deneuve also later played in similar style “musicals,” one of which was another Demy movie. I thought it was a nice throwback to her musical days to have her play a minor role in Dancer in the Dark, a movie that heavily featured musical interludes, in her late 50s.

I love how she wears a bow in her hair in almost every outfit. I must’ve gone through a whole season wearing bows in my hair last year, way before I saw this movie. This blue outfit she is wearing above must’ve been my favorite—double bow! Hehe. This movie will make you want to own tiny umbrellas of various shades and colors to match every outfit, but of course, you realize that’s just a bit too much and too hard to keep up with. I already feel way too gloomy and lazy to do anything dynamic on a rainy day—let alone match matched outfits with umbrellas. That would be too much like dealing with a Rubiks cube. The colors are definitely an ironic match to the mood of this movie, much like the colorful umbrellas in rainy weather. This juxtaposition might’ve just been a by-product of mid-60s French art, but l think this might’ve all been done purposefully.

Like a lot of Euro movies, this one is delightfully open-ended, so the feeling I get from this movie might not be necessarily the same feeling someone else gets from this. I’ll stay away from the plot however, and I’ll just mention that there is one minor scene where Geneviève’s boyfriend Guy enters a bar with girls in pretty much burlesque-like outfits (a PG-13 scene). One attractive blonde lady dressed in similar fashion as the rest of the women walks up to him to flirt. Guy, surprisingly, turns her down rather rudely by telling her to go away and talks with this modestly dressed, yet very attractive brunette instead. Well, they end up going to bed together right away, but that’s not the point. He probably could’ve done the same thing at the same speed with the other lady who was trying a bit too hard to please with the way she dressed, but he didn’t. It’s either he’s done with what he thinks are “easy” girls, or that blondes remind him of Geneviève—or  a combo of both. It wasn’t that he preferred brunettes over blondes either, because his girlfriend was very much a blonde. I thought it was just interesting how this whole scene fell together, which somewhat relates to the theme of this blog (not the part about brunettes vs. blondes).

Deneuve, at least in this movie, reminds me of Tippi Hedren’s clothes in most of her Hitchcock movies with the splashes of color, rigid lines, and of course, the modest outfits. Again, this might’ve just been very typical of day-to-day 60s outfits, which I find very agreeable.

 

Flicks Inflict Fashion II

February 27th, 2011

It’s time for another post documenting movies with noteworthy fashion! I am making “Flicks Inflict Fashion” into a series. The first FIF was posted last August. I’m going to try to make this a regular deal, since my husband and I watch movies a lot and I am also currently in a fun film class. Since I for one hate plot spoilers and dislike  distasteful critic reviews, I have determined to keep this strictly for style observance. Alright, shall we?

Changeling (2008) -Set in the late 20s, this film starring Angelina Jolie (Christine Collins) and all the other women working as telephone operators wore earth-toned colors, furs, brooches, and detailed head pieces (or as my husband repeatedly referred to them during the movie, “heeyatsssss”). You’ll notice that almost every woman in this movie wore some kind of hat, and it made me realize how much more people in general used to accessorize in detail back in the day and how that trend has just kind of gotten lost through the decades. I commend the fact that public and private (e.g., lingerie) clothes were distinctly separate. Sadly, what used to be worn only in the bedroom can now be seen worn in public in today’s fashions. What ever happened to this boundary?


An Education (2009)
– How adorable was Carrie Mulligan in this movie? Her character Jenny and Rosamund Pike’s character Helen in this scene are wearing matching coats and hats, making this a nice visual foil. I like Helen’s clothes a lot more then Jenny’s, even though Jenny’s clothes are generally more conservative. I think it’s because Helen puts more effort into her outfits (probably because she has the money for it), and young Jenny admires that about her. Helen though was a bit of a ditz—a common fashionista stereotype. For a long time, I denied how much I liked and thought about style and fashion because of that very stereotype. To defend my brain, which also processed non-fashion-related things, I avoided associating myself with the fashion community until recently. I guess that’s partly why I started this blog—to redefine fashion by adding more intelligence and sense to it.


Mary Poppins (1964) – Since most people have their eyes on Julie Andrews’ array of dresses, I want to pay special attention to Glynis Johns’ (Mrs. Banks) gorgeous outfits of pastels and beads. Although Mrs. Banks isn’t as young and slender as Mary Poppins, she is able to pull off some amazing looks! You really don’t have to be young and slender to be good at styling yourself. Mrs. Banks’ outfits definitely catch my eye more than Mary’s. I would love to replicate that updo from this screen shot!

Babes in Arms (1939) – Before anything else, does anyone else see that Mickey Rooney looks like a “cuter” Rupert Grint? Anyway, teenage Judy Garland (Patsy Barton) and the other young gals in this movie had pretty casual dresses on. I rarely see casual full-length dresses and skirts worn by high school students and adult women now. We mostly see preschoolers wear dresses on regular days, but older girls rarely do except for special occasions. Do girls wear dresses less now because dresses are more expensive and impractical? Whenever I wear a dress out on a weekday, there is sure to be at least one person who asks me what party I’m on my way to (even the people who should know me better!). What I often see more of nowadays are skinny jeans and short skirts on teenagers and older women alike. How about adding some variety to the wardrobe with some maxi skirts? Maxi skirts are a great deal more versatile compared to dresses—if lack of versatility is the problem. I really am surprised at how attractive maxi skirts can look despite their conservative nature. I should have more of them.

The Fall (2006) – This film looks incredible. Everything in this is highly saturated in color, and the costumes are superb. Justine Waddell (Nurse Evelyn) has such gorgeous dresses on, and I also love how they did her makeup. I even tried to replicate it with some pink and brown eyeshadow, and I liked how that turned out. The visuals in this film are just breathtaking and beautiful. I highly recommend this film to anyone and everyone who hasn’t seen it (and even those who have seen it should watch it again!). This film is eye candy. You will know what a rainbow tastes like after watching this (HAH), but the story is quite entertaining too. You will just die when you see the little girl with the adorable accent in this!

Have you entered the giveaway for a $100 Shopbop gift card? It ends next week!

Flicks Inflict Fashion

August 6th, 2010

It’s the weekend! Here are some movies that I thought were worth mentioning both for their quality and their subtle style inspirations. I realized that I had significantly more posts centered around music, and my film category was barren in comparison. Without giving away any of the plot, I’m going to focus more on the noteworthy fashion in each of these films/shows:

Cold Souls (2009)- Next to French looks, I like Russian styles the best. Dina Korzun’s character, Nina (on the right of the photo above) had on the most amazing outfits I had seen in a relatively new film in a while. I honestly don’t actively look around for fashion-filled content in particular when scouting for new movies to see. I just consider it a big plus to see modestly and stylishly dressed women in them. Sveta (not pictured) was another character in the movie that was very stylish, extravagant, but provocative. I liked a lot of what she was wearing, but I would layer her clothes just to cover up some fleshy areas. Sveta was more wealthy, being an actress, so she could afford lots of high-end clothing and improved on her looks regularly. Nina on the other hand was a hard worker, yet she looked so mod and edgy throughout the entire movie with her blonde, angled bob hair and sophisticated clothing. She was generally modest, and I would definitely wear her clothes as-is! This movie is a must-see, for sure. Take note that there is nudity in this.

A Mighty Wind (2003) - Here’s a Christopher Guest movie that had one scene with clothes that were just too cute to pass up! When I don’t wear something with patterns, I like to replace it with bright pops of color. Blue and gold were my alma mater’s official colors, so seeing these mockumentary folk band’s uniforms was a delight.


Flight of the Conchords (2007-2009)- Even though I already like Jemaine and Bret’s dorky indie looks (and funky sounds), I want to especially mention special guest Kristen Wiig’s character, Brabra (spelled that way intentionally… you just have to see it), in one episode. She was so chic and casual in all her clothes (perhaps three or four outfit changes). I particularly paid close attention to the interesting textures and details in what she was wearing. Like the movie Cold Souls, finding more screen caps means making entire separate posts for those two!


The Knack and How to Get it (1965)- Although I wasn’t blown away by Rita Tushingham’s (Nancy’s) so-so outfits, I liked the movie a lot because it was centered around mods and rockers! It was mostly a mod movie, and I am terribly in love with 60’s fashion and music. I liked the plot, the humor, and the way the scenes were shot, so it was altogether a stylized film in terms of cinematography and writing. The scene captured in the above photo was of Nancy being seduced/flattered by a salesman trying to trick her into buying that coat. Haven’t we all been in this situation? Note that the motif of this film is sexual, but I believe it was making fun of it more than anything.


The Box (2009)- Although I am not a huge fan of 70’s fashion, Norma Lewis (Cameron Diaz) wore some nice retro scarves in this film. She wore different ones all throughout the movie. The Box didn’t do too well in the theaters, just barely making back its gross revenue. The basis for this film was taken from a short story called “Button, Button” in the 70’s, which one of The Twilight Zone’s episodes was also based on. Interested enough? I highly recommend seeing this.

I had loads more to cite in the original draft of this post, but I’ll keep film-related fashion inspirations to at most five reviews! Just like music, I don’t write about anything that I don’t personally think is quality, so you’ll be reading a lot about things I like and enjoy that help shape my taste in clothing.

Rob and I are traveling to New Jersey this weekend for some wedding fun from my dad’s side of the family! Loads of photos will be waiting for next week!

Creative Commons License
ÀLAMODEST / à la Modest / à la Mode St. / alamodest / ALAMODEST / a la Modest / a la Mode St. by Rachel Dahl is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

This site is about Indie / Conservative / Modest / Modesty / Christian / Christianity / Faith / God / Feminism / Fashion / Style / Indie / Alternative / Clothing / Conservative / Republican / Marriage